In the summer of 2003 I drove out to Washington state with a friend to climb Mt. Ranier, the third highest mountain in the lower 48 states after Mt. Whitney (first) and Mt. Shasta (second). The difficulty and danger of an attempt on Ranier lays in the fact that it is a volcanic cone situated very near to the coast and is subjected to unpredictable and extreme weather patterns that often shroud it in high winds and blizzards. Add to that, even when the weather is fair it is still perpetually glacier covered and crevasse ridden on all sides. Deaths on Ranier, while not especially common, do occur. We were very fortunate to have had a few days of good weather for our summit bid and our climb was successful. You can click on any image to enlarge it to full screen.
We started out by taking in the Badlands National Park in Alberta.Recreating a shot I took in 1978 on my first road trip entering Jasper National Park.This is the original shot of me on the "Jasper" sign, taken in 1978 on a road trip to California.Overlooking Banff.Cheyenne mountain.  We climbed up the backside.  The following images show the climb.At the summit area of Cheyenne mountain.  The precipice to the right is sheer.Me, atop Cheyenne mountain.  The drop off on the right is extreme.The ridge is actually quite sharp.  The drop off on the right side is an abyss.Roger Lehman, my travel partner for my Africa trip in 2005, atop Cheyenne mountain.Descending down from Cheyenne mountain along the "scree".  Maddening slip-and-slide hiking.Hiking up and scrambling another of the rockies.Alberta is beautiful country.  On our way scrambling another mountain.Aaron following me up the trail as we scramble another mountain.Nearing the peak of another unnamed mountain we scrambled.The summit of another non-descript mountain who's name I forget.There were snow packs on various other mountains we scrambled.Beautiful countryside in the Alberta rockies.A crappy shot (but the only one I have) of Mt. Ranier, our objective.The start of the two day hike.The beginning of the glacier.